History

Maxine Waters’s Long History of Reckless Rhetoric

Rep. Maxine Waters at a House committee meeting on Capitol Hill, April 20.



Photo:

Tom Williams/Zuma Press

The Ku Klux Klan was in Huntington Beach, Calif., on April 12, holding a “White Lives Matter” rally. It was a 37-minute drive away from the Hawthorne district office of Rep.

Maxine Waters.

Auntie Maxine

” (as the Democrat calls herself) declined to confront the Klan. But she flew all the way to Minneapolis last weekend to coach protesters awaiting the outcome of the

Derek Chauvin

trial.

“I hope we get a verdict that says guilty, guilty, guilty,” Ms. Waters said. “And

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The History of New York, Told Through Its Trash

A few years after I moved to New York, in 2016, a friend invited me to a gallery in Chelsea that was showing the original 16-mm. films of the late artist Gordon Matta-Clark. The most memorable piece of the night was a film called “Fresh Kill,” which narrates the death of an old truck. In the opening shot, the vehicle chugs down a marshy road walled in by reeds. Then a more industrial landscape appears: New York’s notorious landfill, Fresh Kills. We see endless trash-strewn fields, edged by giant machines; colonies of seagulls standing guard under an elevated highway; a

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Oscars this year already have made history

The show is this Sunday — but keep reading to find out why you should get out the popcorn and start celebrating now.

Women in directing: There have been many a year when not a single woman has been nominated for best director.

This year, there are two.

Chloé Zhao, who won a Golden Globe for best directing in March, is up for “Nomadland” (which is also nominated for best picture).
And Emerald Fennell is a contender for her film “Promising Young Woman.”
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The Armenian Genocide, in History and Politics: What to Know

At the risk of infuriating Turkey, President Biden formally announced on Saturday that the United States regards the killing of 1.5 million Armenians by Turks more than a century ago to be a genocide — the most monstrous of crimes.

Mr. Biden was the first American president to make such an announcement, breaking with predecessors who did not wish to antagonize Turkey, a NATO ally and a strategically pivotal country straddling Europe and the Middle East.

The announcement carries enormous symbolic weight, equating the anti-Armenian violence with atrocities on the scale of those committed in Nazi-occupied Europe, Cambodia and

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